Colorful Houses in the Village

Often while exploring the countryside with my trusty Nikon gear, I see colorful homes. Colors in Thailand matter. Each day of the week is assigned a certain color. Thais will say that these colors are lucky and will often wear clothes to match the color of the day. Actually, influence from Hindu mythology gave a color to each day of the week. This was based on the color of the God who protects the day.

Monday – Yellow

Tuesday – Pink

Wednesday – Green

Thursday – Orange

Friday – Light Blue

Saturday – Purple

Sunday – Red

Initially, I thought it was just another superstition in Thailand. And it is. But we Missourians are not much different. Think about it. Yellow is a smiley face. Pink is love. Green is usually thought of being organic and healthy. Supposedly, orange and red make us hungry. That is why most fast food joints are decorated with these two colors. Banks advertise in blue which shows trust. The color purple often represents luxury. Red? Romance.

The color of our house? Brown, which I think is natural. The wife says it reminds her of something else…

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This house was recently rebuilt and painted. Notice the bamboo pole supporting the electrical wires.

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The Color Purple. People that live here do a bit of gardening and sell the produce in the local market.

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An old style Thai house originally built on wooden beams. The beams were replace with concrete poles and block siding installed and plastered in the downstairs area. This type of remodeling seems to be more and more common these days.

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A brand new home built about a year ago. Look closely and there is a star visible in the center front of the house. When asked why, the owners replied “Because we like it”.

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This style of a garage/storage area is often shared between two houses. Typically, everyone is related somehow.

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A family compound built near their surrounding rice fields. Unfortunately, farm loans are readily available to build houses. The ‘chanote‘ or title for the land is used as collateral often causing hardships including losing everything.

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Lot and his wife live here. They have a rice field and he does odd jobs about the village.

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Homemade brooms can be purchased at the house on the left. Much of the time, many Thai houses always seem to have the windows closed. I don’t know why as many have mosquito screens and the dogs will bark at any burglars. Plus, most of these homes do not have AC.

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This is the latest style in rural houses.

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